Paintings to Exhibit at the End of the World, by Adam Turl. Acrylic, cotton, stickers, graphite, coffee and mixed-media on canvas tarps hung in the woods. (2018-2019)

 

Paintings of comrades, friends and loved ones to be exhibited at the end of the world.

 

Anachsa project in irrealist Brechtian cybernetics by Adam Turl with Tish Markley (2018)

Anachsa project in irrealist Brechtian cybernetics by Adam Turl with Tish Markley (2018)

Anachsa project in irrealist Brechtian cybernetics by Adam Turl with Tish Markley (2018)

 

“My name is Redacted. I live in the industrial resort town of Cosmos City on the planet Meadow. I was exiled from back home because of a mumbling bird. This is my blog.”

https://www.anachs.com/

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Spilled Kiosk / Image Picking, by Adam Turl. Stickers, post-card display, cards. (The Barista Who Disappeared, 2018)

Ohio Erasure Castle (The Barista Who Disappeared) by Adam Turl. Acrylic, marker, Sharpie, clay slip, photocopies, stickers, post-it notes, coffee and mixed media on canvas tarp.Also in foreground, What Hurts Also Helps (left) and Alien Space Pirates Flag (right).

New Lubberland (The Barista Who Disappeared), by Adam Turl. Acrylic, marker, Sharpie, clay slip, condoms, photocopies, stickers, coffee, post-it notes, camo and mixed media on canvas tarp (2018).

 

Alex Pullman, the "Barista Who Could See the Future" has gone missing. This installation is a recreation of his studio at the time of his disappearance, including his final predictive works -- New Lubberland vs. Ohio Erasure Castle. In his final vision Pullman imagines the last human PI who discovers a spate of missing persons and realizes that some are escaping to a "Big Rock Candy Mountain"-like paradise called New Lubberland, while others are being kidnapped by a government entity known only as the Ohio Erasure Castle.

 

Revolt of the Swivel Chairs, by Adam Turl, at The Cube Las Vegas (2018)

The Last Barista. Acrylic, stickers, marker, photocopies, buttons, post-it notes, coffee and mixed media on canvas banner with poles (installation view). (2018) (Adam Turl)

 

After the great floods most of humanity moved into the Tower. Robots replaced more and more workers. The unemployed were placed in cryogenic suspension in the basement. The wealthy lived on the upper floors of the tower and collected gilded cat turds called Luries. The workers, on the lower floors, lived in fear of being frozen and sent to the basement. Their leaders were corrupt. The Beggar Queen enriched herself at her supporters’ expense. Temporarily Embarrassed Millionaires blamed refugees from the floods and ‘foreigners’ for the hardships inside the Tower. When the police came to take Emily Slubbing, the last human barista, she resisted and was killed in a stand-off. Her martyrdom sparked the Revolt of the Swivel Chairs. But in the middle of the uprising everyone started speaking in tongues. No one could understand each other. All was lost… until a robot sex worker, Rahab, fused the minds of the robots with the sleeping humans…

Rahab (Revolt of the Swivel Chairs), by Adam Turl. Detail. Acryic, stickers, marker, buttons, post-it notes, stapes, coffee and mixed media on canvas tarps. (2017-2018).

Luries, by Adam Turl. Gold painted cat shit. (2018) (Adam Turl)

Temporarily Embarrassed Millionaires (Revolt of the Swivel Chairs). Acrylic, stickers, marker, photocopies, buttons, post-it notes, coffee and mixed media on canvas tarp (2017) (Adam Turl)

 
 
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The Barista Who Could See the Future (2017) at Gallery 210 (St. Louis). (Adam Turl)

The Barista Who Could See the Future (2016) at Dollar Art House (St. Louis). (Adam Turl)

The Barista Who Could See the Future (2017) at Gallery 210 (St. Louis). (Adam Turl)

 

Alex Pullman, a part time artist and coffee shop worker, believes he can see the future. In his first vision, looking through his grandfather’s telescope, he saw a revolution unfolding on the surface of a colonized Mars. He then foresaw that on the eve of World War Three UFOs would appear in the skies. They froze missiles and bombs in the air and resurrected the world’s communards. In his third vision he saw a million people on rafts fleeing New York City as it drowned in the ocean. Scrambling for their lives they began to denounce each other – and each formed their own personal nation-state.

Lucy Parsons at the Golden Nugget (The Barista Who Could See the Future) (2016). Acrylic, Sharpie, wig hair, glitter, stickers and mixed media on canvas. (Adam Turl)

The Healing Properties of Post-Industrial Debris: IH Bricks (The Barista Who Could See the Future). Acrylic, coffee, glitter ash, stickers, wig-hair, Sharpie on canvas with bricks from the abandoned International Harvester plant in Canton, Illinois and wood (2017). (Adam Turl)

Utah Debt Collector (The Barista Who Could See the Future) (2016). Acrylic, Sharpie, wig hair, glitter, stickers and mixed media on canvas. (Adam Turl)

 

Red Mars (2016). Acrylic, coffee, meteorite dust, glitter, stickers on canvas with telescope, LED sign, cups, found objects and "comic." (Photo: James Byard/Washington University) (Adam Turl)

Red Mars (2016). Acrylic, coffee, meteorite dust, glitter, stickers on canvas with telescope, LED sign, cups, found objects and "comic." (Top Photo: James Byard/Washington University) (Adam Turl)

Red Mars (2016). Acrylic, coffee, meteorite dust, glitter, stickers on canvas with telescope, LED sign, cups, found objects and "comic." (Adam Turl)

 

"I can see and hear the future of colonized Mars, including people’s thoughts, using the telescope on my back porch, off old Highway 13, between Murphysboro and Carbondale, Illinois. My visions came to me jumbled and out-of-order. But I have re-organized my observations to make them comprehensible and grouped them by subject." (Alex Pullman, aka, the Barista Who Could See the Future, 2038)

A note: Alex Pullman was briefly a member of the 13 Baristas Art Collective. In the mid-2030s he moved back home to southern Illinois.

Athena Correctional Facility (Red Mars). Acrylic, stickers, wheat-paste, glitter and meteorite dust on canvas (2016). (Adam Turl)

Red Mars comics (2016) (Adam Turl).

Kuato (Red Mars). Acrylic, stickers, wheat-paste, glitter and meteorite dust on canvas (2016). (Adam Turl)

 
 
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13 Baristas (2015). Acrylic, coffee and gum on canvas with coffee cups, found and sculptural objects, printed newspapers. (Adam Turl)

13 Baristas (2015). Acrylic, coffee and gum on canvas with coffee cups, found and sculptural objects, printed newspapers.(Adam Turl)

13 Baristas (2015). Acrylic, coffee and gum on canvas with coffee cups, found and sculptural objects, printed newspapers. (Adam Turl)

 

The 13 Baristas Art Collective were a group of radical artists and coffee shop workers who were "disappeared" by the authorities following the Chicago uprising of 2037. They chronicled their stories, their dreams and those of their co-workers in paintings and manipulated objects.

Medusa of Old Town Liquors (13 Baristas). Acrylic, coffee and gum on canvas (2015). (Adam Turl)

The Certainty of Math (13 Baristas). Acrylic, coffee and gum on canvas (2015). (Adam Turl)

After You Leave (13 Baristas). Acrylic, coffee and gum on canvas (2015). (Adam Turl)

 
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Dead Paintings no. 10 (2014). Acrylic and mixed-media paintings placed in an earth trench. (Adam Turl)

Dead Paintings no. 2 (2012-2013). Acrylic and mixed-media paintings placed in an earth trench, exhumed, used to create an iron mold. (Adam Turl)

Dead Paintings no. 10 (2014). Acrylic and mixed-media paintings placed in an earth trench. (Adam Turl)

 

In 2047 a group of archeologists and art historians unearthed a series of paintings buried in the earth. Somehow they remained intact. These paintings, when "read" by critical theorists, summoned a great evil. The evil stalked and murdered the archeologists, art historians and visual studies professors until most of them were dead.

Dead Paintings are a series of site-specific installations and "performances" in which paintings are buried in the earth for a period of eight months, exhumed and then displayed in their decayed state.


Social Practice Art Ate My Baby (Cube Gallery) (Las Vegas 2018). (Adam Turl)

Social Practice Art Ate My Baby (Cité internationale des arts) (Paris 2016). (Adam Turl)

Social Practice Art Ate My Baby (Artspace 304) (2018). (Adam Turl)

 

Distributing fast food at art shows.


Design + Cover Art

I Heart Communist Space Pirates on the cover of December 28.2 (2017). (Adam Turl)

The Barista Who Could See the Future on the cover of Red Wedge #5: Bad Dreams. (Spring 2018). (Adam Turl)

Cover art for Octavio Quintanilla's If I Go Missing (Slough Press, 2014). (Adam Turl)

 

Kick the Cat (2015) by Adam Turl. Acrylic, coffee and mixed-media on canvas with found objects, cups and other material. (Project 1612).

Kick the Cat (2015) by Adam Turl. Acrylic, coffee and mixed-media on canvas with found objects, cups and other material. (Project 1612).

Kick the Cat (2015) by Adam Turl. Acrylic, coffee and mixed-media on canvas with found objects, cups and other material. (Project 1612).

 

This is a recreation of an exhibit organized by Mary Hoagland in a Peoria garage in 2041. It included her own work as well as work by the 13 Baristas Art Collective (13BAC), an association of artists spearheaded by Sidney Williams, Maggie Cromwell and Amy Sverdlov.


Workplace of the Future (Painter for Our Time) by Adam Turl. Acrylic, cotton, concrete, newspaper, mixed-media and ash with sharpie on canvas (2014).

A Painter for Our Time (2014) by Adam Turl. Acrylic, cotton, concrete, newspaper, mixed-media and ash with sharpie on canvas, found objects, lights, newspapers. (Safe Space, Lewis Center)

Coal Miner’s Son (Painter for Our Time) by Adam Turl. Acrylic, cotton, concrete, newspaper, mixed-media and ash with sharpie on canvas (2014).

 

This is a reproduction of the studio of Calvin Williams. In 1999 Calvin, a failed painter, became involved in anti-capitalist politics and stopped making art. In 2009 Calvin was fired from his typesetting job at a progressive non-profit book publisher. He fell into a deep depression that was only (temporarily) broken when he began a series of abstract paintings about the U.S. Civil War.

After his unemployment ran out Calvin worked as a barista but was unable to pay his rent. He moved home to St. Louis and stayed with his brother's family. They allowed him use of a single room to continue painting. Calvin desperately tried to find an image, a process or combination of images that would salvage both his own life and the idealistic dreams of his youth.

Neglecting his health, and once again fallen into despair, Calvin passed away in December 2014.


George Jackson (America’s Spiritual Heroes) (2014) by Adam Turl/ Oil, acrylic, cotton, ash, concrete and mixed media on canvas

America's Spiritual Heroes (2014) by Adam Turl/ Oil, acrylic, cotton, ash, concrete and mixed media on canvas with food, found materials and iron.

Lucy Parsons (America’s Spiritual Heroes) (2014) by Adam Turl/ Oil, acrylic, cotton, ash, concrete and mixed media on canvas

 

What I am trying to do in America’s Spiritual Heroes is to move towards a contemporary history painting. The title is a direct response to Anselm Kiefer’s Germany’s Spiritual Heroes. My installation, however, points to a different understanding of history. While Kiefer put Germany’s heroes away in a forgotten attic I have coated mine with concrete, cotton and ash — weighing them down with the actual material history of the nation. I have combined them with other paintings and laid them out on the floor. I intentionally invoked the popular cliché of the political artist painting portraits of radical heroes (and not necessarily radical cultural figures). I did this as a declaration of sincerity and a rejection of the remnants of post-modern irony.