Evicted Art

this website belongs to Adam Turl + Tish Markley


Anachsa project in irrealist Brechtian cybernetics by Adam Turl with Tish Markley (2018)

Anachs/Redacted in Exile

My name is Redacted. I live in the industrial resort town of Cosmos City on the planet Meadow. I was exiled from back home because of a mumbling bird. This is my blog.

https://www.anachs.com/

Anachsa project in irrealist Brechtian cybernetics by Adam Turl with Tish Markley (2018)


Anachsa project in irrealist Brechtian cybernetics by Adam Turl with Tish Markley (2018)

Ohio Erasure Castle. Acrylic, marker, Sharpie, clay slip, photocopies, stickers, post-it notes, coffee and mixed media on canvas tarp.Also in foreground, What Hurts Also Helps (left) and Alien Space Pirates Flag (right).

Medusa of Old Town Liquors (13 Baristas). Acrylic, coffee and gum on canvas (2015).


13 Baristas (2015). Acrylic, coffee and gum on canvas with coffee cups, found and sculptural objects, printed newspapers.

Adam Turl is an artist and writer who lives in Las Vegas, Nevada and St. Louis, Missouri. He is an editor at Red Wedge MagazineTurl's recent exhibitions include Revolt of the Swivel Chairs at The Cube Gallery in Las Vegas, Nevada, Thirteen Baristas at the Brett Wesley Gallery (Las Vegas, Nevada), Kick the Cat at Project 1612 (Peoria, Illinois), The Barista Who Could See the Future, as part of Exposure 19 at Gallery 210 (St. Louis, Missouri) and The Barista Who Disappeared at Artspace 304 (Carbondale, Illinois). In 2016 Turl was a resident at the Cité internationale des Arts in Paris. He is an adjunct instructor at the University of Nevada - Las Vegas.

13 Baristas (2015). Acrylic, coffee and gum on canvas with coffee cups, found and sculptural objects, printed newspapers.

Lucy Parsons at the Golden Nugget (The Barista Who Could See the Future) (2016). Acrylic, Sharpie, wig hair, glitter, stickers and mixed media on canvas.

New Lubberland (The Barista Who Disappeared). Acrylic, marker, Sharpie, clay slip, condoms, photocopies, stickers, coffee, post-it notes, camo and mixed media on canvas tarp (2018).


Revolt of the Swivel Chairs at The Cube Las Vegas (2018)


The Barista Who Could See the Future

Alex Pullman, a part time artist and coffee shop worker, believes he can see the future. In his first vision, looking through his grandfather’s telescope, he saw a revolution unfolding on the surface of a colonized Mars. He then foresaw that on the eve of World War Three UFOs would appear in the skies. They froze missiles and bombs in the air and resurrected the world’s communards. In his third vision he saw a million people on rafts fleeing New York City as it drowned in the ocean. Scrambling for their lives they began to denounce each other – and each formed their own personal nation-state.

A note: Alex Pullman was briefly a member of the 13 Baristas Art Collective. In the mid-2030s he moved back home to southern Illinois.


Social Practice Art Ate My Baby (Cité internationale des arts) (Paris 2016)


Dead Paintings

In 2047 a group of archeologists and art historians unearthed a series of paintings buried in the earth. Somehow they remained intact. These paintings, when "read" by critical theorists, summoned a great evil. The evil stalked and murdered the archeologists, art historians and visual studies professors until most of them were dead.

Dead Paintings are a series of site-specific installations and "performances" in which paintings are buried in the earth for a period of eight months, exhumed and then displayed in their decayed state.

Kick the Cat (2015) by Adam Turl. Acrylic, coffee and mixed-media on canvas with found objects, cups and other material.

The Barista Who Could See the Future at Artspace 304 (2018)


Red Mars (2016). Acrylic, coffee, meteorite dust, glitter, stickers on canvas with telescope, LED sign, cups, found objects and "comic." (Photo: James Byard/Washington University)

Rahab (Revolt of the Swivel Chairs). Detail. Acryic, stickers, marker, buttons, post-it notes, stapes, coffee and mixed media on canvas tarps. (2017-2018).


The Barista Who Could See the Future (2016) at Dollar Art House (St. Louis)

A Painter for Our Time (2014). Acrylic, cotton, concrete, newspaper, mixed-media and ash with sharpie on canvas, found objects, lights, newspapers.

13 Baristas (2015). Acrylic, coffee and gum on canvas with coffee cups, found and sculptural objects, printed newspapers.

Dead Paintings no. 10 (2014). Acrylic and mixed-media paintings placed in an earth trench.

Social Practice Art Ate My Baby (Cube Gallery) (Las Vegas 2018)

Failed Cosmos: 618 Spiders. Based on a poem by Tish Markley (2018)


I Heart Communist Space Pirates on the cover of December 28.2 (2017)


Spilled Kiosk / Image Picking. Stickers, post-card display, cards. (The Barista Who Disappeared, 2018)

After You Leave (13 Baristas). Acrylic, coffee and gum on canvas (2015).


Part of the Revolt of the Swivel Chairs installation is a big rectangle of stickers from which gallery goers can take sticker(s). The stickers are sourced from a mix of hand-made images, digital images, surreal and historical images, etc., built around the working-class informed mythology of this (and previous) installations/painting series. The above photographs are in chronological order. Click for larger image.


The Healing Properties of Post-Industrial Debris: IH Bricks (The Barista Who Could See the Future). Acrylic, coffee, glitter ash, stickers, wig-hair, Sharpie on canvas with bricks from the abandoned International Harvester plant in Canton, Illinois and wood (2017).

Red Mars (2016). Acrylic, coffee, meteorite dust, glitter, stickers on canvas with telescope, LED sign, cups, found objects and "comic." (Top Photo: James Byard/Washington University)

Luries. Gold painted cat shit. (2018) (Adam Turl)


Kick the Cat

This is a recreation of an exhibit organized by Mary Hoagland in a Peoria garage in 2041. It included her own work as well as work by the 13 Baristas Art Collective (13BAC), an association of artists spearheaded by Sidney Williams, Maggie Cromwell and Amy Sverdlov.

Hoagland was born in Peoria, Illinois in 2012. Her father, Mark Hoalgand, worked at Caterpillar for 29 years before losing his job when Mary was three years old. Mary eventually moved to Chicago to study painting at the University of Illinois. She dropped out a year later, found work as a barista in the Bucktown neighborhood and joined 13BAC. 13BAC produced most of their work in a uniform style reminiscent of old punk rock zines, comics and political broadsheets. They were also known for covering their paintings in coffee and using disposable coffee cups as painting surfaces. Amy Sverdlov also recruited Mary into the Socialist League for a United Revolutionary Party (SLURP).

In 2037 Haogland was seriously injured in a car accident on Lake Shore Drive. During her recovery she moved back home to Peoria and began a series of ctional paintings about the children of Caterpillar workers—“Kick the Cat”—named for the rank-and- le union newsletter produced by union militants in the 1990s.

Unfortunately, Hoagland’s output was limited by injuries and poverty. She depended on SSI and food stamps and frequently could not afford painting supplies. She lived in her brother’s garage until her death in 2049.

Kuato (Red Mars). Acrylic, stickers, wheat-paste, glitter and meteorite dust on canvas (2016).

Povich Deer (Revolt of the Swivel Chairs). Acrylic, stickers, marker, photocopies, buttons, post-it notes, coffee and mixed media on canvas banner with poles (installation view). (2017-2018) (Adam Turl)


Red Mars

"I can see and hear the future of colonized Mars, including people’s thoughts, using the telescope on my back porch, off old Highway 13, between Murphysboro and Carbondale, Illinois. My visions came to me jumbled and out-of-order. But I have re-organized my observations to make them comprehensible and grouped them by subject." (Alex Pullman, aka, the Barista Who Could See the Future, 2038)

A note: Alex Pullman was briefly a member of the 13 Baristas Art Collective. In the mid-2030s he moved back home to southern Illinois.

Athena Correctional Facility (Red Mars). Acrylic, stickers, wheat-paste, glitter and meteorite dust on canvas (2016).

America's Spiritual Heroes (2014). Oil, acrylic, cotton, ash, concrete and mixed media on canvas with food, found materials and iron.

Dead Paintings no. 10 (2014). Acrylic and mixed-media paintings placed in an earth trench.

Red Mars (2016). Acrylic, coffee, meteorite dust, glitter, stickers on canvas with telescope, LED sign, cups, found objects and "comic."


Cover art for Octavio Quintanilla's If I Go Missing (Slough Press, 2014)

Anachsa project in irrealist Brechtian cybernetics by Adam Turl with Tish Markley (2018)

Anachsa project in irrealist Brechtian cybernetics by Adam Turl with Tish Markley (2018)

Erasure Chancellor/Carlo Montemagno Eats Brains (The Barista Who Disappeared). Acrylic, marker, Sharpie, photocopies, coffee, stickers, post-it notes, and mixed media on canvas tarp


The Barista Who Disappeared

Alex Pullman, the "Barista Who Could See the Future" has gone missing. This installation is a recreation of his studio at the time of his disappearance, including his final predictive works -- New Lubberland vs. Ohio Erasure Castle. In his final vision Pullman imagines the last human PI who discovers a spate of missing persons and realizes that some are escaping to a "Big Rock Candy Mountain"-like paradise called New Lubberland, while others are being kidnapped by a government entity known only as the Ohio Erasure Castle.

The Certainty of Math (13 Baristas). Acrylic, coffee and gum on canvas (2015).



Spilled Kiosk / Image Picking. Stickers, post-card display, cards. (The Barista Who Disappeared, 2018)

Social Practice Art Ate My Baby (Artspace 304) (2018)


Utah Debt Collector (The Barista Who Could See the Future) (2016). Acrylic, Sharpie, wig hair, glitter, stickers and mixed media on canvas.


Revolt of the Swivel Chairs

After the great floods most of humanity moved into the Tower. Robots replaced more and more workers. The unemployed were placed in cryogenic suspension in the basement. The wealthy lived on the upper floors of the tower and collected gilded cat turds called Luries. The workers, on the lower floors, lived in fear of being frozen and sent to the basement. Their leaders were corrupt. The Beggar Queen enriched herself at her supporters’ expense. Temporarily Embarrassed Millionaires blamed refugees from the floods and ‘foreigners’ for the hardships inside the Tower. When the police came to take Emily Slubbing, the last human barista, she resisted and was killed in a stand-off. Her martyrdom sparked the Revolt of the Swivel Chairs. But in the middle of the uprising everyone started speaking in tongues. No one could understand each other. All was lost… until a robot sex worker, Rahab, fused the minds of the robots with the sleeping humans…

Temporarily Embarrassed Millionaires (Revolt of the Swivel Chairs). Acrylic, stickers, marker, photocopies, buttons, post-it notes, coffee and mixed media on canvas tarp (2017) (Adam Turl)


The Barista Who Disappeared (2018) at Artspace 304

13 Baristas (2015). Acrylic, coffee and gum on canvas with coffee cups, found and sculptural objects, printed newspapers.

13 Baristas

The 13 Baristas Art Collective were a group of radical artists and coffee shop workers who were "disappeared" by the authorities following the Chicago uprising of 2037. They chronicled their stories, their dreams and those of their co-workers in paintings and manipulated objects.

From the final edition of the 13 Baristas newspaper (2037):

IN 2028 two art school drop-outs and baristas formed the “13 Baristas Art Collective.” While we always claimed to have 13 members, largely for narrative purposes, we never had more than four members at any one time.

Maggie Cromwell, now missing, and Sidney Williams, the son of the late painter Calvin Williams, were the main force behind the “collective.”

Four years ago Amy Sverdlov moved into their southwest side studio. Maggie and Sidney met during the 2025 strikes. Amy, a former coffee shop employee and adjunct art professor, joined them after the planning meetings for the 2033 relief demonstrations.

The goal of our collective was always to elevate the complex narratives of oth- er “proletarians”—not reduced to some abstraction, nor seen in isolation from social class.

Maggie believed that our work should serve two purposes:To assert the pathos of proletarian morality in the present. And if we failed to abolish the current order, serve as a cultural building block for those remaining, those who would rebuild in the ruins.

The Carbondale Nightlife


Revolt of the Swivel Chairs at The Cube Las Vegas (2018)

The Last Barista. Acrylic, stickers, marker, photocopies, buttons, post-it notes, coffee and mixed media on canvas banner with poles (installation view). (2018) (Adam Turl)